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This concept came up in my friendly match with some of my boys, but sometimes, it happens in tournaments. What do you think is ethical, sound, and PRAGMATIC? I'm speaking about reality.

I got three rules about being hit...

1. Was it malicious? You can tell when they are being malicious/evil/over the top. It's their reaction after the shot. Then, what?

2. Was it accidental? Once again, it's the reaction of the player plus was it a frame? a fluke?

3. Did you just get in the way? some players just play tennis. It's just tennis. Like it's just business, nothing personal. course, if we're playing mixed, and you drill an overhead through my women partner at point blank range--that's wrong.

Tags: ethics, hi10spro, retaliation, tennis

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Mr. Jessie L. said:
I guess i'm a JERK!!haha jp

Yea if this was a Tourney then it would be a lil different..and Yes, you are a Jerk Mr. Jessie! lol, jk jk i would make the feel really really bad to try and make me look really really good! haha
tournament..it's on like donkey kong...

friendly... hard to say...heck, my friends cheat like dogs when we just practice...kills me...
I personally think that if you've got an easy overhead, you need to go at the player at the net. I'm not saying hit them in the head or chest, but hit it at their feet so they can't do anything with the ball.

If you hit them.... oh well... that's part of tennis. The object of the game is to win the point, not be worried about hitting the player.

There is a big difference between intentional, and playing the ball correctly. Just my .02 cents
A. Were not women or I should say I am not.
B. It is a tennis ball not a hockey puck. Haven't had stitches yet on the court.
C. If it is on purpose and not near your feet ...and there is not an acceptable apology a hockey expression might come in handy
"Keep Your Head Up Man" (cause one is coming back for you).
D, Getting hit lower legs or feet...not worth an apology ... maybe a thank you for being considerate for the person hit.
LOVE YOUR REPLY! so on the dot... it's a man's game...unless you're playing mixed...the best though is when a woman pegs a guy in mixed

william said:
A. Were not women or I should say I am not.
B. It is a tennis ball not a hockey puck. Haven't had stitches yet on the court.
C. If it is on purpose and not near your feet ...and there is not an acceptable apology a hockey expression might come in handy
"Keep Your Head Up Man" (cause one is coming back for you).
D, Getting hit lower legs or feet...not worth an apology ... maybe a thank you for being considerate for the person hit.
Golden Rule for cheating an this situation: Do onto others Twice as many times done to you.

OUCH!!
Randy Lynn Rutledge said:
Over the years, in my group teaching sessions, I often team up with the weakest player of a foursome so that he/she can receive some double strategy tennis tips during an actual doubles match. There is always the player who wants to take advantage of the situation and try to look good by coming at me when my partner, whose level of play is far below everyone else on the tennis court, hits a floater. No problem. These guys are my students, so I just make sure that they understand that if they are successful in hitting me, and I think that it was done on purpose, I fully intend to pay back with as close as I can come to a 10-1 ratio. This usually helps them to get on the same page and focus on why we are having the practice doubles session.
Great point. There is a big difference between practice and league play. It really does matter how important the match is. And your point about a weaker player on the court is well taken too. In mixed, I often have a weaker partner and the rules are different here again.

Randy Lynn Rutledge said:
Over the years, in my group teaching sessions, I often team up with the weakest player of a foursome so that he/she can receive some double strategy tennis tips during an actual doubles match. There is always the player who wants to take advantage of the situation and try to look good by coming at me when my partner, whose level of play is far below everyone else on the tennis court, hits a floater. No problem. These guys are my students, so I just make sure that they understand that if they are successful in hitting me, and I think that it was done on purpose, I fully intend to pay back with as close as I can come to a 10-1 ratio. This usually helps them to get on the same page and focus on why we are having the practice doubles session.
sigh....it's difficult though isn't it when you deal with junior players--boys are easy, but girls...but I kind of believe in the golden rule also---there's a point in the match where it's on...and that's the decision you made when you hit me three times...

CoachV - William Vazquez said:
Golden Rule for cheating an this situation: Do onto others Twice as many times done to you.
I so agree. intentional and tennis are two different things

Blake GiantTennis.com said:
I personally think that if you've got an easy overhead, you need to go at the player at the net. I'm not saying hit them in the head or chest, but hit it at their feet so they can't do anything with the ball.

If you hit them.... oh well... that's part of tennis. The object of the game is to win the point, not be worried about hitting the player.

There is a big difference between intentional, and playing the ball correctly. Just my .02 cents
10 to 1 ratio... I LOVE THAT... that's poor form when you use your partner as an achilles heel...but it happens.

i once played in an 8.0 league--my partner was a 3.0... and these people didn't know us--our team was all 5.0's and 3.0's so they didn't know the 5.0's nor the 3.0's...they were 4.0's... so they were going after us--5.0's and 3.0's alike... basically, when we warm up 5.0's don't do much in the warm ups, we're warmed up before we play so we all cruise...then, the match starts and we play. i had a guy overhead at me, i volleyed it, and then, closed in to slam the winner through him... and i was looking around... that was pretty much what was happening... the 4.0's were playing through the 5.0's, and the 5.0's started playing through them in return... needless to say, it was interesting because then, the focus was on retaliation for the 4.0's as they went after the 5.0's and forgot about the 3.0's... easiest matches we had all season...

Mark / Mr. Mayor said:
Great point. There is a big difference between practice and league play. It really does matter how important the match is. And your point about a weaker player on the court is well taken too. In mixed, I often have a weaker partner and the rules are different here again.

Randy Lynn Rutledge said:
Over the years, in my group teaching sessions, I often team up with the weakest player of a foursome so that he/she can receive some double strategy tennis tips during an actual doubles match. There is always the player who wants to take advantage of the situation and try to look good by coming at me when my partner, whose level of play is far below everyone else on the tennis court, hits a floater. No problem. These guys are my students, so I just make sure that they understand that if they are successful in hitting me, and I think that it was done on purpose, I fully intend to pay back with as close as I can come to a 10-1 ratio. This usually helps them to get on the same page and focus on why we are having the practice doubles session.
I actually played tennis as a junior, then went pro and played in various sectional open circuits for a few years. I didn't experience much issues with jr's in the comments you mentioned.
In overall scheme its usually the club hackers that want to be better that don't develop the skills to be better through some lessons that get the most frustrated or resort to antics to frustrate their opponents in order to win.

During my time on a tennis board, it was always the club hacker by which i mean the beginner to 4.0 level players, which is most of the club members that would be the ones complaining about certain rules.

I think as in everything else those that can get to the higher levels have to learn to deal with the things that could be frustrating or else they wouldnt advance to higher levels.
Although Johnny Mac seemed to not cope well and he is an all time great.

Yet overall its my experience that people that resort to petty antics such as hit the ball to the far corner or games like that are ultimately frustrated with their own level and are passively attempting to frustrated their opponent through such actions.
As for reputations, I have learned to form my own opinion after I met and interact with someone or a club.

Alot of talk on certain clubs, people event tennis websites but I reserve comment until I observe it on my own.
K

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