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my nominee is the half volley. You end up hitting it when you don't want to.

Tags: gary, half, hi10spro, placement, sakuma, strategy, tennis, volley

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Another great video Gary. I would say this is one of the most difficult shots to learn because the timing must be precise. Alot of players will get the timing down, but hit it in the net alot. Make sure to get down with the ball - deep knee bends - and make sure you get the racquet head under the ball and come up and over as you contact and follow through. A great way to practice this is to play mini tennis - where you rally with a friend and both of you stand at the service line. The ball must bounce. You have to hit softly, This really helps train a swing to get under and come up and over the ball as well as developing the ever-difficult half volley. Agassi started each practice with mini tennis.
Hey Steve, thanks for the tips. I always start off with mini-tennis and find that it really helps my timing and gets me to start watching the ball. I actually think that the BH volley is much harder to master than the FH volley. Any tips on this stroke? I played 4.5 doubles last night and realized that this was a vulnerability.
M
your backhand volley should be similar in motion/ FROM IMPACT as your slice backhand.



Mark / Mr. Mayor said:
Hey Steve, thanks for the tips. I always start off with mini-tennis and find that it really helps my timing and gets me to start watching the ball. I actually think that the BH volley is much harder to master than the FH volley. Any tips on this stroke? I played 4.5 doubles last night and realized that this was a vulnerability.
M
Here are some tips for the BH volley:
First, and most important is a beginner's tip - when at the net, ALWAYS make sure you are in the "ready position" with the racquet up and in front of your body and non-dominant hand cradling the throat of the racquet. Keep that racquet vertical and the head almost out in front of your face. You don't ever want to take this lightly, or be lax on this - especially in doubles because when your partner hits thats soft second serve, and you are at the net...well we have all been there. The returner may blast that ball right at your body or face, and having that racquet up in proper "ready position" will prepare you for this, and keep you from eating fuzz sandwiches! Matter of fact, if your double's partner has a softer serve, than just expect this "head hunting" to happen. Be ready for it! And know where you want to volley before the ball comes at you - the gap between your two opponents or at the other net-man's feet are high percentage plays.
The actual Volley itself is rather straightforward. Always keep a firm grip for your volleys, unless they are drop volleys which is another topic. Your racquet head should start above the plane of the ball just slightly, and racquet head should be open slightly as well. Your backswing should be minimal if any. Make contact out in front of the body with a short, compact, punchy feel - FIRM GRIP at impact, and DO NOT let your raquet head fall below your grip hand. In other words, keep that racquet head up through impact. No full swing, and no full follow through. If you volley into the net alot, ask yourself if your head is not widing up below your grip hand after impact. If the ball is low, and barely clearing the net-tape, then bend those knees deep and keep the racquet vertical with the same racquet posture in mind. Good volleyers make thier legs do the work to get them down and in position for the ball, and the mechanics of the shot do not have to change.
Best of luck!
My vote is the backhand topspin. Getting depth is a challenge
here's one video on backhands

one hander

a bit more on teaching it

Bob Lovinger said:
My vote is the backhand topspin. Getting depth is a challenge
How about serving? how high to jump and how far to lean in?

No problem. The BH groundstroke is more fluid, easier, and more natural a stroke than the forehand. For one thing, your body is not in the way of your hitting arm as in FH. The BH stroke is freer as your stroking arm and racket move out front--and away from your body. I finally taught myself a reliable penetrating topspin FH stroke over 15 years ago: Use a tennis machine for a total of 20 hours by yourself. I did about 5 hours a week, experimenting with stroke mechanics on court. Soon my BH was better than my FH. Consult some books and videos for correct mechanics-- then test various methods with the ball machine. I used the tossing a frisbee motion, among others. And remember to turn sideways (toes pointing to sideline) and get low--bend those knees and use correct grip--Eastern BH--with index finger knuckle on top bevel of racket---Good fortune to you. Mikee.

Bob Lovinger said:
My vote is the backhand topspin. Getting depth is a challenge

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