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When do you go down the line or Crosscourt? or come to net?

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you can't get around it... if they are more consistent then you, you have to shorten the points. I chip and charge, give them no rhythm, and push the envelop...but it's gimmicky...

Kevin Kauffman said:
Well consistency comes from learning proper stroke techniques. The most consistent pros like Evert and Borg had very consistent shots that didn't break down, so learning proper foundation of groundies is key.
Learn the correct foundation first!

Gary Sakuma said:
what do you do if they're more consistent than you.

Martin Daugherty said:
I only play doubles so when I'm at the net the feet are always moving to keep both the baseline safe and the "poach" alive.
If they are more consistent than you from the baseline get them out of this area, dropshot, hit short balls, most baseliners are not as consistent at net.

Kevin Kauffman said:
Well consistency comes from learning proper stroke techniques. The most consistent pros like Evert and Borg had very consistent shots that didn't break down, so learning proper foundation of groundies is key.
Learn the correct foundation first!

Gary Sakuma said:
what do you do if they're more consistent than you.

Martin Daugherty said:
I only play doubles so when I'm at the net the feet are always moving to keep both the baseline safe and the "poach" alive.
yep not too many baseliners like to move forward.

Kevin Kauffman said:
If they are more consistent than you from the baseline get them out of this area, dropshot, hit short balls, most baseliners are not as consistent at net.

Kevin Kauffman said:
Well consistency comes from learning proper stroke techniques. The most consistent pros like Evert and Borg had very consistent shots that didn't break down, so learning proper foundation of groundies is key.
Learn the correct foundation first!

Gary Sakuma said:
what do you do if they're more consistent than you.

Martin Daugherty said:
I only play doubles so when I'm at the net the feet are always moving to keep both the baseline safe and the "poach" alive.
Dear Gary Sakuma,

I've always calculated the movement of my opposition to that of what a movement in "chess" would equate with. I will be more specific later on in this thread. However, to defeat a basliner one needs to rely on several key factors: (1) Anticipation. (2) Strategy. (3) Fitness. (4) Mental Toughness. (5) Preparation. Of course, the list is seemingly endless with having the right skill-set and attributes that you need to be the very best player you can be on court. In this instance, the baseliner is a player that likes to grind-and-grind from various positions on the court. They're strengths rely on being in control of the center of the tennsi court and mastering foot-work, tenacity, mental-toughness and shot foot-speed.

If your looking to beat a good baseliner at any level of the game just execute the following tips:

(1) Mix up your shots as much as possible by changing your angles on the court. This will make him or her scramble and most
likely be out of position to react and be ready for the next shot.

(2) Approach the net no matter how bad you think your volleys are, because the percentages are in your favor to win most points.
Why? Because applying that additional preasure takes him or her out of her comfort zone and will feel chocked when they're
forced to make a better shot to pass you with.

(3) If you drop shot on one point in every game, I guarantee that you'll be amazed on how many cheap ponits you can win with
this tactic. It is so under-utilized in todays game that I'm just shocked not to see it implemented more frequently on the court.
If your playing a speed-demon, then simply drop shot them, and once they're at net lob over the head and come into the net
and close the ponit out. You win!!!

I simply just wanted to give you three examples on effective strategy on how to beat a base-liner, also, don't forget the elements your playing in such as the wind, sun and court surface and use these externals to your advantage.

Here is my chess related strategy:

(1) Rook:Base-liner/Serve-and-Volley.
(2) Queen:All-Court-Player.
(3) King:Someone that is slow, but effective in shot making; or slow and bad at shot making depending on your opponent.
(4) Pawn: A player that has the potential to be converted into any player mentioned above. This player can be dangerous.
(5) Horse: This player uses angles and likes to taunt their victims by playing unconventional tennis in a very unorthodox way.

Have a great game.

Sincerely,

Jason Lampione.
(2)

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